Door Types WIKI is under development

A Free information page to help you make the right choices when it comes to doors and door funtiture.

Many kinds of doors have specific names, depending on their purpose. The most common variety of door is the single-leaf door which consists of a single rigid panel that fills the doorway. Many variations on this basic design are possible, such as the double-leaf door or double doors and French doors that have two adjacent independent panels hinged on each side of the doorway.

hinged doors

Single Door

A single door is simply a door that is on its own within a door casing or door lining

Double Doors

Double Doors

Bi Fold Doors

A bifold door is a door unit that has several sections, folding in pairs. Wood is the most common material, and doors may also be metal or glass. Bifolds are most commonly made for closets, but may also be used as units between rooms.

Engineered Doors

Engineered Doors

Dutch doors or stable Doors

Dutch doors or stable Doors

Patio Doors or Stacker Doors(US)

Patio Doors or Stacker Doors(US)

Sliding Doors

Sliding Doors

French Doors

A French door is a door (installed singly or as one of a matching pair or series) consisting of a frame around one or more transparent and/or translucent panels (called lights or lites); it is also called a French window as it resembles a door-height casement window. A pair of French doors does not generally include a central mullion (as do some casement window pairs), thus allowing a wider unobstructed opening. The frame typically requires a weather strip at floor level and where the doors meet to prevent water ingress. An espagnolette bolt allows the head and foot of each door to be secured in one movement. The slender window joinery maximizes light though into the room and minimizes the visual impact of the doorway joinery when considered externally.

Composite Doors

Composite doors are the latest type of door used in homes today.
Composite doors have been designed to take into consideration the flaws experienced in single material made door. Using a combination of materials which are selected for their beneficial properties, composite doors allow for the old flaws to be effectively 'designed out'.

Softwood Doors

Softwood Doors

Hardwood Doors

Hardwood Doors

Wooden Doors

Wooden doors are the earliest type of door used in homes and have varied in design and style over the years.
The appearance and feel of a wooden door remains highly desirable today.

White moulded panel doors

A moulded door has the same structure as that of flush door. The only difference is that the surface material is a moulded skin made of MDF. Skins can also be made out of hardboards.

White moulded panel doors come in a large range of styles, sizes & finishes including standard core moulded panel doors, solid core moulded panel doors & fire core moulded panel doors.
White Moulded panel doors are the most popular door choice in the UK today with over 75% of UK homes having moulded doors installed, this is because moulded doors come in a wide choice of designs, available in more sizes than any other doors & are available with smooth finish or the much loved grained effect finish.
All moulded doors come pre-primed white ready for you to give the final coat of your desired paint except our fully finished moulded doors which only require the edges of the door to be painted as they come already painted for you.
view the range of white moulded panel doors including, standard core moulded doors, solid core moulded doors, bi-folding moulded doors, glass moulded doors, fire moulded doors & french moulded doors so why wait take a look around our website and see which moulded doors you would like in your home.

Stiles and rails - As above, but usually smaller. They form the outside edges of the door.
Core material: Material within the door used simply to fill space, provide rigidity and reduce druminess.
Hollow-core - Often consists of a lattice or honeycomb made of corrugated cardboard, or thin wooden slats. Can also be built with staggered wooden blocks. Hollow-core flush doors are commonly used as interior doors.
Lock block - A solid block of wood mounted within a hollow-core flush door near the bolt to provide a solid and stable location for mounting the door's hardware.
Stave-core - Consists of wooden slats stacked upon one another in a manner similar to a plank & batten door (though the slats are usually thinner) or the wooden-block hollow-core (except that the space is entirely filled).
Solid-core - Can consist of low-density particle board or foam used to completely fill the space within the door. Solid-core flush doors (especially foam-core ones) are commonly used as exterior doors because they provide more insulation and strength.
Skin - The front and back faces of the door are covered with HDF / MDF skins.

Fire Doors

Fire Doors

Flush Doors

Flush Doors

A flush door is a completely smooth door, having plywood or MDF fixed over a light timber frame, the hollow parts of which are often filled with a cardboard core material. Skins can also be made out of hardboards, the first of which was invented by William H Mason in 1924. Called Masonite, its construction involved pressing and steaming wood chips into boards. Flush doors are most commonly employed in the interior of a dwelling, although slightly more substantial versions are occasionally used as exterior doors, especially within hotels and other buildings containing many independent dwellings.

Many modern doors, including most interior doors, are flush doors:
Stiles and rails - As above, but usually smaller. They form the outside edges of the door.
Core material: Material within the door used simply to fill space, provide rigidity and reduce druminess.
Hollow-core - Often consists of a lattice or honeycomb made of corrugated cardboard, or thin wooden slats. Can also be built with staggered wooden blocks. Hollow-core flush doors are commonly used as interior doors.
Lock block - A solid block of wood mounted within a hollow-core flush door near the bolt to provide a solid and stable location for mounting the door's hardware.
Stave-core - Consists of wooden slats stacked upon one another in a manner similar to a plank & batten door (though the slats are usually thinner) or the wooden-block hollow-core (except that the space is entirely filled).
Solid-core - Can consist of low-density particle board or foam used to completely fill the space within the door. Solid-core flush doors (especially foam-core ones) are commonly used as exterior doors because they provide more insulation and strength.
Skin - The front and back faces of the door are then covered with wood veneer, thin plywood, sheet metal, fiberglass, or vinyl.
The wooden materials are usually layered with the grain alternating direction between layers to prevent warping.
Fiberglass and metal-faced doors are sometimes given a layer of cellulose so that they may be stained to look like real wood.